An Autumn Wreath

An Autumn Wreath

Hanging a wreath to welcome visitors is such an easy way to bring nature into the home; it acts as a reminder, too, of the seasonal changes as we hurtle head first through yet another year. Creating an autumn wreath has long been top of my to do list, and last week, as the morning of Halloween dawned and copper and claret leaves fluttered around the garden, I decided I would put it off no longer. I spent a happy half hour searching for materials, and although I had been planning to create the wreath inside, it was so warm I remained in the garden, making the whole process seem even more peaceful and gratifying.

I started, then, by searching through the garden for branches and berries to use, and managed to find an interesting mix of hedgerow clippings and herb patch discoveries (rosemary proved a particularly useful filler, and smells delectable). I then picked a couple of pieces of holly and added conifer foliage for a brighter green colour to lighten the overall effect.

For the base I used a willow wreath that I bought from a local shop last year (see here for similar), but you could use a wire one if you prefer.

Wicker wreaths are so easy to work with, so in the end I used no string or method to attach everything together other than sliding in the stems and branches between the wicker. I began with the foliage and longer stems before adding the holly and berries at the end.

It really was as simple as that! What do you think of the finished wreath?

What I love is that I can remove and add foliage and berries as the month progresses and nature begins to adapt to the fall of the year. I'll be using the same base for my Christmas wreath too, but adapting the style and colours to fit the festive season.

Do any of you display wreaths throughout the year?

Eleanor is obsessed with stories. She writes for a number of online spaces including This is Your Kingdom, edits Creative Countryside, curates #aseasonalyear and teaches at Chalk House. In addition, she is currently studying for an MA in Creative Non-Fiction Writing. You'll find her roving the fields of the Lincolnshire Wolds or planning her next rural adventure.